Artist, Author, Druid, Educator, Polymath, Technologist. CEO TechnoMagickal. Co-Founder, CTO and Chief Learning Officer, TMRW Group. Ed Lead, Octivo Australia.

Having your child diagnosed with dyslexia or one of the other neurodiverse traits can be a traumatic situation that often leads to the panic of what to do to help. Since every neurodiverse person is different, what to do can differ greatly. But beyond the issue of specific treatments and assists, there are some principles that you can follow that are universal.

We have a dyslexic daughter who also has ADHD. My wife is also dyslexic and ADHD. I am mildly ADHD. It is not uncommon for one or both parents to share some or all of the traits. …


Since the development of writing we have gradually privileged text literacy above other forms of communication. Even oratory, one of the pillars of Greek civilisation, has been subsumed in the march of text literacy above all else. In education we put so much emphasis on text literacy that children who have difficulty with text are labelled disabled and moved off into special education programs, suggesting that there is something wrong with them that needs to be fixed. Aside from humanitarian principles, the march of technology has made this fixation on text untenable.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Green Chameleon on Unsplash

Before Text

The word literacy is defined as the ability to read and write. It seems that once we developed writing, probably in multiple places over a long period of time, writing set out to overthrow the importance of other forms of communication and transmission of ideas. It makes sense, writing is amazing and powerful. …


I am blessed with having friends of all sorts, from so many countries, religions, ethnicities, experience and professions. There are values in such diversity that you may not expect.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Duy Pham on Unsplash

Context

I am very lucky that I live in a society that is diverse and multi-cultural. Where I live, in Melbourne Australia, is a large city with people and communities from all over the world. When we are not in lockdown we can chose from any nationality for dining. My favourite restaurant is an Afghan one I’ve been going to for over 30 years, with the same family owning it. My daughter has grown up there and they know us well. …


Governments across the world have, to varying degrees, exercised control over universities. In the English-speaking world in particular, alternating waves of Reaganite or Thatcherite economics, the so called economic rationalism, have been juxtaposed with more left-wing social opportunity and equality policies. All of these have impacted universities in various unexpected ways.

This series of articles examines the deep and profound structural issues in post-secondary and adult education, examines the disruptive forces at work and works towards a new model of adult education that can truly work for all.

Here is part two. There is a bit of stats in this article as this information forms an important background for many of the articles to follow. …


With the recent world catastrophe that is Covid-19 dominating people’s minds, it is timely to examine the central role China has played as the source of pandemics over time.

Movie billboard saying the world is temporarily closed
Movie billboard saying the world is temporarily closed
Photo by Edwin Hooper on Unsplash

The Hard Facts

While it is sometimes hard to tell, particularly as we go back in time, the following pandemics are deemed to have started in China:

Plague in the 6th Century

Bubonic Plague in the 14th Century

Plague in the 19th Century

Influenza pandemic of 1918–19

Asian Flu pandemic of 1957–59

Hong Kong Flu pandemic of 1968

Russian Flu of 1977

SARS Coronavirus pandemic of 2002–03

Avian influenza bird pandemic of 2013-present

The present coronavirus Covid-19 pandemic is related to the SARS Coronavirus of 2002, and originated in China in 2020. …


Education administrators and governments seem to be totally detached from any understanding of the real world when it comes to designing curriculum. Nor do they seem to care how making students study something they are ill suited and unmotivated for will destroy self-confidence and create negative internal dialogue. It also wastes time that could be more productively spent. An example of this (though not the only) is the way maths is taught. The traditional math pathway taught in almost all high schools is designed to prepare students for higher education studies in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math)[1]. …


Governments are made up of people, and so a government can exhibit all the same ‘personality traits’ that people do. They can be self-absorbed, naturally defensive, forgetful, distracted, following the wrong path, overwhelmed or completely sociopathic. We’ve seen all of the above from governments during Covid-19. Like people, governments need to be encouraged, and sometimes forced, onto a path of introspection, analysis and then self-improvement.

This short series of articles examines the deep, long hidden structural issues that many countries have, that have been exposed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Previous articles in the series have looked at the Lack of Trust in Science and the Casualisation of the Workforce. …


An old university building with ivy on the walls
An old university building with ivy on the walls
Photo by Darya Tryfanava on Unsplash

This series of articles examines the deep and profound structural issues in post-secondary and adult education, examines the disruptive forces at work and works towards a new model of adult education that can truly work for all.

Here is part one.

A university radio station interior
A university radio station interior
Photo by Paolo Nicolello on Unsplash

Higher Education Is in Trouble, And Should Be, an Introduction to the Series

Even before Covid-19, higher education was dead in the water, it just didn’t generally realise it. Propped up by government policies, current business practices, the massive self-interest of the sector itself and the connivance of the professional bodies, the body is still twitching but life has departed.

Having spent over 40 years in higher education in one role or another, this greatly saddens me to say. But the truth is that the writing has been on the wall for over 20 years, and my growing clarity of this has paralleled my growing dissatisfaction with the sector and unease at its practices. …


This short series of articles examines the deep, long hidden structural issues that many countries have, that have been exposed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Previous articles in the series have looked at the Lack of Trust in Science.

Here is part two.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Georg Arthur Pflueger on Unsplash

Casualisation of the Workforce

Over my working life there have been massive changes in the workforce and its structure. In the late 1970’s and early 80’s there was plenty of work, salaries and salary increases were good and living costs were moderate. Jump forward to today and the picture is very different.

The rise of the gig economy, as it is called, has moved many workers from full time or permanent part time employment to being employed casually. According to Gallup, 36% of US workers were involved in the gig economy in some way, either for their primary or secondary employment, in 2017. In Europe the same year the percentage is 9.7%[1]. …


A blurred building in the background
A blurred building in the background
Photo by Manos Gkikas on Unsplash

A massive tsunami has travelled around the world in the form of the Covid-19pandemic. That wave is in the process of toppling what looked like strong buildings. What’s more, it is washing away the sand to expose the very suspect foundations upon which much of our recent developments in society have been built. It is time to fully expose these suspect foundations on which our economic and political lives depend.

Across a short series of articles I’m going to examine these issues. Here is part one.

A Lack of Trust in Science

One of the first structural issues exposed by Covid-19 is a broad lack of trust in science. We’ve seen this over and over again in so many ways, first with climate change and now with the Covid-19 pandemic. At least it is something that scientists are widely aware of and much discussion has occurred on it, such as in this workshop proceedings from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine. …

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store